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Standards for Prisoners and Offenders

Revised Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (External link) then go to E/CN.15/2015/L.6/Rev.1

The above standard is also known as the ‘Nelson Mandela Rules’ and is a landmark update of the Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners first adopted in 1955 and the result of five years of negotiations among Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs), including UNODC, civil society groups and independent experts and consultants. (October 2015)

Treatment of Women Prisoners and Non-custodial Measures for Women Offenders (External link)

The United Nations Rules for the treatment of women prisoners and offenders - commonly known as the Bangkok Rules - were adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 21 December 2010.

Standard Guidelines for Corrections in Australia

The Standard Guidelines for Corrections in Australia and their accompanying principles constitute outcomes or goals to be achieved by correctional services, rather than a set of absolute standards or laws to be enforced.

The guidelines represent a statement of national intent, around which each Australian State and Territory jurisdiction must continue to develop its own range of relevant legislative, policy and performance standards that can be expected to be amended from time to time to reflect 'best practice' and community demands at the state and territory level.

The guidelines are currently under review (2017).

Indigenous Strategic Framework

The Indigenous Strategic Framework guides the management of Indigenous prisoners and offenders in Corrections across Australia and New Zealand.

It was developed by the Corrective Services Administrators Council (CSAC) Indigenous Issues Working Group and endorsed by the Corrective Services Ministerial Council (CSMC) in July 2016.

It should be used in conjunction with the above Standard Guidelines for Corrections in Australia.

Correctional Management Standards for Prisons (Men and Women)

The Correctional Management Standards for Men’s Prisons in Victoria and the Standards for the Management of Women Prisoners in Victoria establish the minimum requirements for correctional services in Victorian prisons. The Standards provide a basis for ensuring accountability and a consistent level of service delivery across the system.

Correctional Management Standards for Community Correctional Services

The Correctional Management Standards for Community Correctional Services establish the minimum requirements for community corrections in Victoria. They serve as a benchmark against which the performance of the system can be monitored and thus provide the basis for ensuring accountability and a consistent level of service delivery across the system.

Correctional Management Standards for Women Serving Community Correctional Orders

The Correctional Management Standards for Women Serving Community Correctional Orders provide a reference point for staff and offer specific guidance to those staff working with women in a Community Correctional Service (CCS) environment.

They also ensure consistency in service delivery across Victoria’s CCS locations and provide a benchmark against which the system can be monitored.

These standards complement the Correctional Management Standards for CCS, which establish the minimum requirements for community corrections in Victoria.

Correctional Management Standards for the Post-Sentence Supervision and Detention of Serious Sex Offenders

The Correctional Management Standards for the Post-Sentence Supervision and Detention of Serious Sex Offenders establish the minimum requirements for the management of serious sex offenders on post-sentence orders in Victoria.

They support the organisational governance arrangements for this cohort by Corrections Victoria and align with the standards relevant to the prison system and Community Correctional Services, allowing for continuity and consistency in sex offender management across the whole of the correctional system.

Commissioner's Requirements set out high level requirements in respect of operational matters. They are issued when specificity is required to ensure consistency and/or continuity of correctional practice across the whole of the prison system, encompassing both publicly and privately managed prisons.